#214 – Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) in the snow – The PYG Track and Llanberis Path

The view across to Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) on the Beddgelert walk (post #213)

The view across to Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) on the Beddgelert walk (post #213)

The view of a snow-covered Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) on our Beddgelert walk (see post #213) was very tempting, but November snow in England and Wales doesn’t usually hang around for very long, so I needed to get a move on if I wanted to have a day out on the ‘white stuff’.    Settled weather and a couple of cold nights were encouragement enough, so two days later I was back in Snowdonia for a bit more mountain fun.

On the PYG Track above Glaslyn

On the PYG Track above Glaslyn

I’ve done the PYG Track/Llanberis Path version of Yr Wyddfa more times than I care to remember, so why repeat it?    Simply because it’s a classic day out through incredible scenery to one of the finest peaks in the UK.     So it gets very busy – so what?    Others are entitled to their share of heaven!     I left the car in Llanberis and used my ‘old git’s’ bus pass to get to the start point at Pen y Pass.     From there I would take the PYG Track to the summit, followed by a long downhill stroll back to the car on the Llanberis Path.

Starting out from Pen y Pass (Note the red warning sign by the path)

Starting out from Pen y Pass (Note the red warning sign by the path)

Border Collie ‘Mist’ enjoying another mountain day

Border Collie ‘Mist’ enjoying another mountain day

In summer the mountain railway hauls passengers from Llanberis to the summit of Yr Wyddfa, but in winter the track is usually blocked by snow towards the top of the mountain.    This puts the summit café out of action, which means that the facilities summer tourists would expect are not available, and warning signs at the start of all the paths up the mountain make this clear.     In fact, as the winter develops, mountaineering skills are often required to make the trip safely, but many still get caught out.

Crib Goch ….

Crib Goch ….

…. often mistaken for Yr Wyddfa (just appearing in the centre)

…. often mistaken for Yr Wyddfa (just appearing in the centre)

Setting out on the PYG Track from Pen y Pass, the eye is drawn to an obvious peak – many mistakenly assume that this is Yr Wyddfa, the summit of Snowdon, but it is in fact Crib Goch.      Yr Wyddfa doesn’t come into view on this path until the start point of Crib Goch is reached, and making the wrong route finding decision here can literally prove fatal, making the Crib Goch Ridge one of the main accident blackspots in winter.

Not much snow on the PYG Track at this point ….

Not much snow on the PYG Track at this point ….

…. and not much looking back ….

…. and not much looking back ….

…. but that changes after the Miners Track junction

…. but that changes after the Miners Track junction

Crib Goch wasn’t on my itinerary today though.      It was almost certain that any snow on the ridge would have been stripped off by the wind, and I was after a snow day, so I carried on towards the junction of the PYG Track and the Miners Track.     Quite often this is where the snowline starts, as was the case today – small groups dithered around, deciding whether to carry on or turn back, but I was ready with ice axe and crampons and after a quick brew of coffee it was time to crack on.

 Poorly equipped walker slithering down the path ….


Poorly equipped walker slithering down the path ….

…. and definitely not having a fun day

…. and definitely not having a fun day

Just beyond my brew stop I met the first of several walkers who were not having a good day – a woman with a bag slung across a shoulder and wearing inadequate bendy boots, was slithering uncertainly down the path.    I asked her if she was OK, and she hissed through clenched teeth that she was, so we went our separate ways – I kept a watchful eye on her until she reached easier ground.

Better equipped walker – just on the ‘zig-zags’

Better equipped walker – just on the ‘zig-zags’

Further up, the path has a set of prominent zig-zags and the trickiest part of the route under snow for those without winter gear is potentially from here to the bwlch (pass) at the top of the PYG Track.     What snow there is collects naturally on the path and gets compacted by the passage of many pairs of boots.    The result is a ribbon of icy snow where boots can scarcely get a grip without the use of crampons.

Beyond the ‘zig-zags’ heading for the Bwlch (Group of walkers just above centre)

Beyond the ‘zig-zags’ heading for the Bwlch (Group of walkers just above centre)

I met two big groups on their way down, with none of them wearing crampons.     I decided that it would be a good deed to use my ice axe to cut some steps for them, but there was also a bit of self-interest involved – had anyone slipped, I would have felt obliged to help, so it was better all round to prevent an accident.    I was somewhat bemused with the second group though, as a couple of them stood next to me leaning on their ice axes as I cut steps for their mates – they seem to have got the message that they should “carry an ice axe in winter” but hadn’t got round to actually using them!

The ‘Standing-stone’ at the Bwlch, with walkers coming off Crib y Ddysgl ….

The ‘Standing-stone’ at the Bwlch, with walkers coming off Crib y Ddysgl …

…. and more heading for the summit of Yr Wyddfa

…. and more heading for the summit of Yr Wyddfa

Approaching the summit by the railway line

Approaching the summit by the railway line

Getting some practice in taking ‘selfies’

Getting some practice in taking ‘selfies’

Arriving at the bwlch brings a dramatic change of scenery, with the narrow confines of the upper path replaced by long-distance views in all directions.     This is a major junction of paths to and from the summit, and is busy on most days of the year.     I followed the upper section of the railway line to the summit, watching a paraglider pilot having fun – after a quick ‘selfie’ and another wet of coffee it was time to start heading down.

Time to head back – leaving the summit

Time to head back – leaving the summit

‘Mist’ enjoying a run on the snow-covered Llanberis Path

‘Mist’ enjoying a run on the snow-covered Llanberis Path

The snow starts to thin out above Clogwyn Station

The snow starts to thin out above Clogwyn Station

Beyond the top of the PYG Track I set off down the Llanberis Path.     In summer this is a tedious slog up and an easy yomp down, but in winter it carries a particular hazard – the railway line makes much easier walking than the path, but one section between the top of the PYG Track and Clogwyn Station is another accident blackspot.     The railway gets banked up with snow, which then freezes to the hardness of concrete – a slip here can lead to a slide down a convex slope to the cliffs of Clogwyn Coch, and there have been several fatal accidents here over the years.

Dusk starts to fall – looking back up the railway line near to Clogwyn Station

Dusk starts to fall – looking back up the railway line near to Clogwyn Station

There’s something very satisfying about finishing a mountain day as the light starts to fade.     Chris (me missus) doesn’t really go for walking in the dark, so two days earlier I had timed the end of our Beddgelert walk to coincide with dusk – today there was just myself to please, and leaving Pen y Pass after midday had guaranteed a finish in the dark, and the changing colours of the sky made a spectacle that was almost impossible to capture in a photo.

Looking northeast towards the Glyderau

Looking northeast towards the Glyderau

…. and looking southwest

…. and looking southwest

If the photos didn’t do justice I could still enjoy the show.    Eventually it was time to break out the headlight, and I noticed several pin-pricks of light on the surrounding hills as others had the same idea.    I wasn’t in any great rush to finish, and even Border Collie ‘Mist’ seemed to have forgotten it was well past her dinner time.     We finished in the dark as planned, with the lights of Llanberis below – the perfect end to a perfect day!

Time to head for home ….

Time to head for home ….

…. with the lights of Llanberis below and my headlight reflecting on the dog's harness

…. with the lights of Llanberis below and my headlight reflecting on the dog’s harness

Text and images © Paul Shorrock

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#213 – Beyond Beddgelert

Looking down to Llyn Dinas

Looking down to Llyn Dinas

November 2016 saw a sudden change from the mild autumn we had been enjoying to a short, sharp taste of winter to come.    Chris didn’t fancy anything too dramatic and Border Collie ‘Mist’ was happy to be out anywhere, so it was my choice then – a couple of years earlier we had spent a warm, sunny autumn day in the hills above Beddgelert (see post #168) but had missed out a chunk of ground near to Llyn Dinas.    Time to remedy that then.

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#212 – Bleaklow from Snake Pass

The Pennine Way near Bleaklow

The Pennine Way near Bleaklow

I’m not saying that I’ve turned into a ‘fair weather walker’, but It’s good to be able to pick and choose hill days according to the conditions.    It doesn’t always work that way though – I had to taxi Chris to an event in Stockport and was looking for a short-ish day out for me and Border Collie ‘Mist’.    The Pennine Way National Trail passes nearby, crossing the A57 Snake Pass road, so that was an easy decision – the harder decision was whether I should bother on a damp misty afternoon.

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#211 – Cat Bells – small but perfectly formed!

Heading south on the Cat Bells Ridge

Heading south on the Cat Bells Ridge

Our day on Skiddaw (see post #210) had been a change from our local hills in North Wales, and a check on the weather forecast showed it looking fair for the day after.   It didn’t take long to decide to grab another lakes day, but where?    A short hill day before driving back to Wales (including a dog walk for Border Collie ‘Mist’) was looking favourite, and we were in the Northern Lakes so it had to be Cat Bells.

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#210 – Skiddaw and t’ Back o’ Skidda

Heading for Skiddaw, with Little Man looming ahead

Heading for Skiddaw, with Little Man looming ahead

I’ve avoided Skiddaw (or ‘Skidda’ as the locals call it) for many years.  My first brush with the mountain as a teenager ended in a dismal retreat in a rainstorm, and I didn’t go back for almost twenty years.    On that second visit I was a mountain rescue dog handler on an early morning search for a missing walker, which ended sadly with the man’s body being found.    My third visit was so unmemorable that I don’t even remember it!

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#209 – Mam Tor, the Shivering Mountain

Mam Tor from the Great Ridge

Mam Tor from the Great Ridge

Living in North Wales, there really isn’t any need to go far for a good day out in the mountains, but sometimes it’s good to have a change.   A Peak District trip was on the cards, and one walk I never tire of is the Great Ridge from Mam Tor (also known as The Shivering Mountain) – OK, so Mam Tor might not have the wildness of the Carneddau (see post #208) but the Great Ridge is said to be one of the best walks in the Peak, and who am I to disagree.

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#208 – Back to the Carneddau. Again!

Yr Elen and Carnedd Dafydd under cloud – situation normal!

Yr Elen and Carnedd Dafydd under cloud – situation normal!

For all sorts of reasons I haven’t been getting out on the mountains of the Carneddau over the summer months as much as I would have liked, so a free day and a reasonable weather forecast was all it took to tempt me out.    Border Collie ‘Mist’ is always up for a long mountain day, so rucksack packed it was game on!


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