#155 – The Southern Peaks of the Carneddau, North Wales

Carnedd Dafydd from Pen yr Ole Wen

Carnedd Dafydd from Pen yr Ole Wen

The route, travelling clockwise

The route, travelling clockwise

Back to the hills of the Carneddau this week. I tend to bang on a bit about these wild, deserted hills, and a day there never disappoints. My last trip there had been just a few weeks back (see Post #151) but I fancied a return trip to the south side of the range – the traverse of Pen yr Ole Wen, Carnedd Dafydd, Carnedd Llewelyn, Craig yr Ysfa and Pen yr Helgi Du makes a good day out in anyone’s book, and I’ve posted about these hills before (see Posts #26 and #108)

Llyn Ogwen with Y garn behind

Llyn Ogwen with Y garn behind

Llyn Ogwen and Tryfan

Llyn Ogwen and Tryfan

The start of the East Ridge of Pen yr Ole Wen

The start of the East Ridge of Pen yr Ole Wen

I always start Pen yr Ole Wen by the East Ridge – there’s a great little rocky scramble that is spoiled only by being too short, and the whole route is preferable to the sweaty slog up the south side that starts near Ogwen Cottage. What’s more the scenery is better, with great views of Y Garn and Tryfan.

“You mean we have to go up there”?!

“You mean we have to go up there”?!

The same place in winter (JB)

The same place in winter (JB)

 

Dog’s eye view of the problem

Dog’s eye view of the problem

Tryfan from the East Ridge

Tryfan from the East Ridge

The same view in winter 1½ years ago (JB)

The same view in winter 1½ years ago (JB)

The lake of Ffynnon Lloer

The lake of Ffynnon Lloer

 

The same view in winter (JB)

The same view in winter (JB)

Looking back down the East Ridge

Looking back down the East Ridge

When I reached the short scramble I realised that it was 1½ years since I had been here (see Post #108). On that occasion, the steep, rocky groove had been banked up with snow, and Border Collie ‘Mist’ had shot straight up – this time it was naked rock, and on her first attempt there was a thrutchy scrabble as ‘Mist’ attempted (literally) to get to grip with the problem. I quickly got her harness fitted, and used a rope from above to give some assistance. From there it was a steady walk to the top.

On the summit of Pen yr Ole Wen, with Tryfan (centre) and Glyder Fach behind and right

On the summit of Pen yr Ole Wen, with Tryfan (centre) and Glyder Fach behind and right

The ridge to Carnedd Dafydd

The ridge to Carnedd Dafydd

Carnedd Dafydd summit

Carnedd Dafydd summit

Healthy eating!

Healthy eating

Heading towards the top of Ysgolion Duon

Heading towards the top of Ysgolion Duon

The next objective from Pen yr Ole Wen was Carnedd Dafydd, named after one of the last true Princes of Wales (read more about the story of Prince Llewelyn and Prince Dafydd in Post #26). A broad ridge gave easy walking with great views, and dog and I were soon at the top and ready for a food stop – a couple of biscuits for ‘Mist’ and my healthy-eating option of a fried egg and bacon roll. (That’s healthy-eating in the sense that not eating is definitely not a healthy option)

The cliffs of Ysgolion Duon

The cliffs of Ysgolion Duon

Carnedd Llewelyn, at 1064 metres the highest point on the circuit

Carnedd Llewelyn, at 1064 metres the highest point on the circuit

Last top of the day – Pen yr Helgi Du

Last top of the day – Pen yr Helgi Du

From Carnedd Dafydd the route continued along the top of the impressive crags of Ysgolion Duon (the ‘Black Ladders’). These north facing cliffs don’t get much sun, and have never been popular rock-climbing crags, but in a good winter they provide good snow and ice routes – not today though!   Another steady pull led up to the summit of Carnedd Llewelyn, the highest point of the day (and the third highest peak in Wales) at 1064 metres (3490 ft). From there it was downhill to the top of Craig yr Ysfa.

Hill ponies

Hill ponies

Local residents

Local residents

Non-local residents! Must be ‘rush hour’

Non-local residents! Must be ‘rush hour’

Taking our place at the rear of the queue

Taking our place at the rear of the queue

On the way down I bumped into some of the local residents, the hardy hill ponies who live out on the hills of the Carneddau all year, summer and winter. Soon after that there was another entertaining scramble at Craig yr Ysfa, leading down to the col of Bwlch Eryl Farchog. It briefly turned into rush hour conditions, as I ran into the back of a large group on the same descent. The dog and I were still at the rear of the queue for the short scramble on to Pen yr Helgi Du, but the leader of the group took pity on us and let us through.

Looking back from Pen yr Helgi Du to Craig yr Ysfa and Carnedd Llewelyn

Looking back from Pen yr Helgi Du to Craig yr Ysfa and Carnedd Llewelyn

The long grassy ridge of Yr Braich ….

The long grassy ridge of Yr Braich ….

…. and part of the straightest road in Wales

…. and part of the straightest road in Wales

Almost at journey’s end – on the old turnpike road at Gwern Gof Uchaf

Almost at journey’s end – on the old turnpike road at Gwern Gof Uchaf

Having squeezed past the group, ‘Mist’ shot ahead to the summit with me close behind. From there it was a glorious easy romp down the grassy ridge of Yr Braich, avoiding the long straight tarmac road to the west as long as possible. From there I passed the most hazardous part of the route (the crossing of the busy A5) before joining the old Turnpike Road, giving a quiet, traffic-free yomp back to the car near the farm at Gwern Gof Uchaf – all in all a good day out with 16kms (10 miles) of walking and 1087metres (3566 ft) height gain.

Carneddau panorama – about 8kms (5 miles) of hill walking above 900 metres altitude (2950 ft)

Carneddau panorama – about 8kms (5 miles) of hill walking above 900 metres altitude (2950 ft)

Text and images © Paul Shorrock – Images tagged (JB) © John Bamber

About Paul Shorrock

I've been mucking about in the mountains for longer than I care to mention. I started out by walking my local hills, then went on to rock climbing, mountaineering and skiing. Still doing it, and still getting a buzz. I'm now sharing the fun, through my guided walking business (Hillcraft Guided Walking) and by writing routes for other publishers, mainly Walking World and Discovery Walking Guides. Just to make sure I keep really busy, I am also currently a member of my local mountain rescue team.
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9 Responses to #155 – The Southern Peaks of the Carneddau, North Wales

  1. I like the way you can do side-by-side photos on your theme – very effective for the summer/winter contrasts. Pretty sure I can’t do that…

    I always thought that scramble up to Pen Yr Helgi Ddu was really exposed-feeling and quite hard – I’ve only ever done it once. I’ll have to go back and see what I think nowadays. I never minded the Craig Yr Ysfa one though…

    Nice to see some hill ponies 🙂
    Carol.

    • Thanks Carol.

      For the photos I justify one pic ‘left’ then the other one ‘right’, then reduce the image size on both until they both fit – it plays havoc with the text initially, and it’s best to finish with a full size image to prevent the text from bleeding back.

      Yes, the Helgi Du scramble is a wee bit exposed, but it’s short and non-technical – nowt to a Munro bagger of your experience 🙂

  2. Looks like a great hike. Love the Ponies!

    • Hi again Plant Girl – you will soon be an expert on our Welsh hills by coming on these virtual hikes 🙂
      We frequently see the wild ponies on this group of hills, and a couple of miles south, across the busy road I mention in the post, there is a herd of wild goats. I guess your wildlife is probably a bit more exotic than ours.

  3. LensScaper says:

    This is a great walk, Paul. My daughter and I did it in reverse about 5 years ago but took the direct route off Pen yr Ole Wen down to Ogwen. My daughter was not too impressed with that choice of route for the descent! I must explore the other route you use on your way up to this peak.

  4. Pingback: #156 – Y Garn and Foel Goch in the Glyderau | Paul Shorrock – One Man's Mountains AKA One Pillock's Hillocks

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